Beginning of the colorful world of unicolored cars, part 1.

2017-04-28 Beginning of the colorful world of unicolored cars, part 1.

As folk wisdom speaks, dreams give names to things, and colors to the world. From this thesis, it’s just a step away to the next: colors give the cars a character of sorts. Is that really so? Are we aware of it, all of us and has it always been so?

BASF has published data about colors of new cars most frequently chosen by customers. In 2016 as many as 29 percent of new cars were painted white. Black lacquer was found in 19 percent of cars, gray in 18. Further positions were taken by silver (12%), blue (10%), red (6%), brown (4%), beige and green (1% each). As many as 78 percent of these colors are part of the gray scale. The thesis that today’s motorization seems to be monochromatic begins to be mathematically justified. It’s not just that; technologically, today cars have almost the same level, and the choices of customers are made based on nuances in the form of more or less justified sympathy for a specific brand. They visually merge on the streets into one mass; grey...

In 1900, while preparing for the first Gordon-Bennett Cup - a long-distance race organized by James Gordon-Bennett, there occurred an idea of distinguishing rival teams using different colors of the car body. The rule was simple - each team could put out only one car produced in their country and painted in an individual color. The author of this division of colors was a Pole - an enthusiast and racing driver, count Eliot Zborowski. He proposed a division that is closely related to the colors used on national flags of individual teams: French cars were to be painted in blue, German in white, Belgian in yellow, American in red. This division was approved by the international car federation FISA and was valid for racing cars until 1968. After this time, the changes were enforced by sponsors who were quickly increasing amongst participants; they, in turn, began painting car bodies in their company colors. Not everyone, however, has always complied with this division ...